Allowing puppet agents manage their own certificates

What?

Why would you want to allow a puppet agent manage the certificates the puppet master holds for that agent? Doesn’t that defeat the whole purpose of certificate based authentication in puppet?

Well, yes, it does, but there are situations in which this is useful, but only where security in not a concern!!

Enter Cloud Computing.

Servers in Cloud Computing environments are like fruit flies. There are millions of them all over the world being born and dying at any given time. In a an advanced Cloud configuration they can have lifespans of hours, if not minutes.

As puppet generally relies on fully qualified domain names to match agent requests to stored certificates, this can become a bit of a problem, as server instances that come and go in something like Amazon AWS can sometimes be required to have the same hostname at each launch.

Imagine the following scenario:

You are running automated performance testing, in which you want to test the amount of time if takes to re-stage an instance with a specific hostname and run some tests against it. Your script both launches the instance an expects the instance to contact a puppet master to obtain its application.

In this case, the first time the instance launches, the puppet agent will generate a client certificate signing request, send that to the master, get it signed and pull the necessary catalog. The puppet master will then have certificate for that agent.

Now, you terminate the instance and re-launch it. The agent presents another signing request, with the same hostname, but this time the puppet master refuses to play, telling you that it already has a certificate for that hostname, and the one you are presenting doesn’t match.

You’re snookered.

Or so you think. The puppet master has a REST api that is disabled by default but when you can open up to it receive HTTP requests to manage certificates. To enable the necessary feature, add the following to your auth.conf file

path /certificate_status
auth any
method find, save, destroy
allow *

Restart the puppet master when you’ve done this.


sudo service puppetmaster restart

Next, when you start you server instance, include the following script at boot. It doesn’t actually matter when this is run, provided it is run after the hostname of the instance has been set.


#!/bin/bash

curl -k -X PUT -H "Content-Type: text/pson" --data '{"desired_state":"revoked"}' https://puppet:8140/production/certificate_status/$HOSTNAME

curl -k -X DELETE -H "Accept: pson"  https://puppet:8140/production/certificate_status/$HOSTNAME

rm -Rf /var/lib/puppet/ssl/*

puppet agent -t

This will revoke and delete the agent certificate on the master, delete the agent’s copy of the certificate and renew the signing process, giving you new certs on the agent and master and allowing the catalog to be ingested into the agent.

You can also pass a script like this as part of the Amazon EC2 process of launching an instance.

aws ec2 run-instances  --user-data file://./pclean.sh

Where pclean.sh is the name of the locally saved script file, and it is saved in the same directory as your working directory (otherwise include the absolute path).

With this in place, each time you launch a new instance, regardless of its hostname, it will revoke any existing cert that has the same hostname, and generate a new one.

Obviously, if you are launching hundreds of instances at the same time, you may have concurrency issues, and some other solution will be required.

Again, this is only a solution for environments where security is not an issue.

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